Congratulations!

Recent Student Milestones

Debbie Gomez defended her dissertation, "Assessing the long-term effects of brief behavioral health treatment in primary care patients." / August 2017

Bianca Villalobos defended her dissertation, "Testing an integrated model of help seeking for behavioral health concerns in an ethnically diverse primary care patient sample." / June 2017

Maegan Calvert defended her third year project, which included a conceptual paper on maternal PTSD-related alexithymia as a potential inhibitor of healthy emotion socialization. / July 2017

Aubrey Dueweke defended her third year project, which included a conceptual paper on practice components of effective suicide interventions in primary care / November 2016

Lab Team

Graduate Students

Elizabeth Anastasia

Curriculum vitae

Elizabeth ("Beth") is a sixth year graduate student in the doctoral clinical psychology program. She earned her B.A. in Psychology and Spanish at the University of Michigan.

Beth's primary research interest centers around strategies for reducing health disparities for underserved populations by increasing access to mental health care. She is interested in understanding how integrated behavioral health care may reduce barriers to mental health treatment for Latinos. Her dissertation uses mixed-methodology to examine how Latino and non-Latino White patients of an integrated primary care clinic perceive barriers to receiving treatment in primary care behavioral health and specialty mental health. In her thesis, she examined the role of fatalismo in explaining Latinos' use of medical and mental health services. Beth has provided therapy to underserved groups, in both English and Spanish, at an integrated primary care clinic and a local domestic violence shelter. She is currently preparing a manuscript on recommendations for therapists working with undocumented immigrants and has experience conducting psychological evaluations for immigration-related legal concerns and writing hardship and asylum letters.

Juventino Hernandez Rodriguez

Curriculum vitae

Juventino ("Juve") is a sixth year graduate student at the University of Arkansas, currently completing his predoctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina. He earned his B.A. in Psychology from Arizona State University. He is an American Psychological Association (APA) Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Fellow.

Juve has two primary research interests. His first research interest is in understanding the relation between acculturation and psychosocial adjustment in immigrant Latino youth. Specifically, he is interested in examining pathways that lead to psychosocial adjustment. Towards these efforts, as part of his dissertation, Juve is conducting a meta-analysis of all studies that examine acculturation and psychosocial adjustment in Latino youth. His second interest is in community-based (e.g., K-12 schools, primary care) prevention and intervention programs for at-risk, underserved youth. Towards these efforts, Juve has conducted research on the utility of school-based mentoring for peer victimized grade-school children, and on risk factors for peer victimization and internalizing symptoms.

Juve's clinical interest is in culturally-sensitive evidence-based therapies for underserved children and families. He has provided clinical services at Community Clinic, a federally qualified health center, and the UA Psychological Clinic. He has provided clinical services in English and Spanish to children, adolescents, and adults in both settings. Juve has also conducted psychological evaluations, provided evidence-based individual therapy as well as evidence-based couples and family therapy.

Consistent with his research and clinical interests, Juve is also involved in advocacy efforts that promote the training and dissemination of psychological science. On the national level, Juve has advocated on behalf of the APA MFP program and the APA Office of Education Government Relations. On the local level, Juve has served on the board of the UA Latino Alumni Society and has worked with local Latino organizations in Northwest Arkansas whose missions are to help at-risk Latino youth.

Maegan Calvert

Curriculum vitae

Maegan is a sixth year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She completed her undergraduate studies at Eastern Michigan University where she earned her B.S. in Psychology.

Maegan's research interests are in how traumatic stress experiences influence well-being and parenting in underserved populations. Specifically, she is interested in how these processes impact economically disadvantaged and minority groups in order to better inform treatment practices for underserved communities. Relatedly, Maegan is also interested in the determinates and correlates of the intergenerational transmission of trauma and the prevention of the cycle of abuse. She is also interested in empirically supported principles of change to address the questions: a) for what problem, b) by whom, and c) under what circumstances does treatment of traumatized children and families work.

Clinically, Maegan has focused on providing services to underserved women and children who have experienced domestic violence, sexual violence, and child maltreatment in residential treatment and community outreach centers.

Aubrey Dueweke

Curriculum vitae

Aubrey is currently a fourth year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology doctoral program at the University of Arkansas. She completed her undergraduate studies at Oberlin College, where she earned her B.A. in Psychology and Hispanic Studies.

One of Aubrey's primary lines of research is centered on developing a comprehensive understanding of how to improve risk assessment and intervention for suicidal behavior. She is also very passionate about reducing health disparities and improving access to care for underserved populations, and this passion forms the backbone of her second line of work. For her thesis, Aubrey tested whether brief, passive psychoeducation on the topic of suicide could effectively increase knowledge about risk and protective factors, decrease stigma, and facilitate more positive attitudes toward seeking professional help among a population of first generation Latino immigrants. Her interest in modifying these interventions to minimize barriers to care and maximize clinical research was solidified after she spent her clerkship year working as a behavioral health intern at a primary care practice. Currently, Aubrey is interested in exploring whether suicide risk assessment and intervention conducted within an integrated behavioral health care setting can be effective at reducing symptoms and improving accessibility to care for suicidal patients.

Linda Guzman

Curriculum vitae

Linda is a first-year graduate student in the clinical psychology doctoral program at the University of Arkansas' Department of Psychological Science. She completed her B.A. in psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and then completed post-baccalaureate research assistantships at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her interests include studying resiliency and adaptiveness in youth, service utilization amongst underserved populations, and integrated behavioral health care as a way to reduce barriers and improve treatment outcomes for populations.

Roselee Ledesma

Curriculum vitae

Roselee is a first-year graduate student in the clinical psychology doctoral program at the University of Arkansas. She completed her undergraduate studies at Marquette University. Her research interests include intersectionality, cultural values, and microaggressions' effects on mental health in underserved populations.


Graduate Student Collaborators

David Sparkman

Curriculum vitae

David is a fifth-year graduate student in the experimental psychology doctoral program at the University of Arkansas, working under the mentorship of Dr. Scott Eidelman.

Danielle Baker

Curriculum vitae

Danielle is a third-year graduate student in the clinical psychology doctoral program at the University of Arkansas, working under the mentorship of Dr. Jennifer Veilleux.


Undergraduate Research Assistants

Deborah Corimbelly, B.S.

Deborah is a post-baccalaureate research assistant in the DREAM lab. She received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley in 2017. Deborah is interested in pursuing a degree in business and in researching the distinguishng features of top employees.

Devynne Diaz

Devynne is an honor's senior at the University of Arkansas, double majoring in Psychology and Journalism. She is interested in learning how to incorporate cultural understanding and appreciation of diversity when approaching mental health issues in minority communities.

Vanessa Hutcheson

Vanessa is a junior at the University of Arkansas. She has an interest in the development of mental disorders in minority populations and how to break the boundaries when it comes to accessing mental care help. Through the DREAM lab, Vanessa plans on gaining experience in community-based research and improve her understanding of minority populations.

Brittany Johnson, B.S., B.A., M.A.T.

Brittany obtained her B.S. in Physics and B.A. in English in 2010, and completed her M.A.T. in Secondary Science Education in 2011. Brittany is interested in pursuing a graduate degree in mental health and in working with underserved populations to increase access to mental health services.

Mikenna Marin, B.A.

Mikenna is a post-baccalaureate research assistant in the DREAM lab. She obtained her B.A. in Psychology from the University of Arkansas in 2017. She is interested in pursuing a career in global health and sustainability, with a focus on community outreach and impact.

Kiera Michailoff

Kiera is a junior majoring in Psychology at the University of Arkansas. She is interested in pursuing graduate studies in clinical psychology, with a research emphasis in working with minority groups and decreasing negative stigmas surrounding mental health.

Lydia Oshomuvwe

Lydia is a junior at the University of Arkansas, majoring in Psychology with minors in management, general business, and criminal justice. She is also an honor's student. Her interests are in how best to understand and treat mental illness in minority communities.

Michaela Ramsey

Michaela is an honor's student majoring in Psychology at the Univerity of Arkansas. She is in her junior year. Michaela is interested in pursuing a graduate degree in child psychology and has an interest in researching behavioral issues associated with childhood abuse.

Kenah Smith

Kenah is a junior majoring in Psychology at the University of Arkansas. Her research interests are in adolescent psychology, with a focus on children who have experienced trauma, discrimination, and bullying.

Tiana Williams

Tiana is a junior at the University of Arkansas and is currently majoring in Psychology with a minor in African American Studies. She is interested in figuring out various methods to break down racial and ethnic barriers to accessing mental health care.

Mark Winn

Mark is a junior majoring in Psychology at the University of Arkansas. His research interests are in understanding the barriers that the Latino/a community faces in regards to mental health care.

Copyright Dr. Ana Bridges

Updated: August 2017